Epistemological Impossibilities

Sunday, April 30, 2017

In January, I decided to keep a log of all the books I had read this year. By mid-February, I was having trouble with my eyesight, and by the end of February, I had basically lost my vision and required emergency surgery. So I lost a couple months of reading. Luckily, as George Costanza would say, I'm back, baby.

This year is also the year when I hope to complete the book I am writing. Because I have been feeling a bit inundated by online articles, I decided to make a concerted effort to read as many books as possible. I often say that I read books for a living, but mostly that means skimming books and reading articles. (I’m not going to record the many articles, academic and otherwise, I’m reading.) I like to read really long books because of the sense of accomplishment that comes with finishing them. But honestly I rarely have the time or attention span that I wish I did. Anyway, here is a list of books I’ve read so far in 2017, with some commentary on each. I will try to update it every few months; hopefully this will force me to read books cover to cover.

Saturday, December 3, 2016

I am very pleased to share an article written by Dr. Timothy Nunan based on his interview of me for the Global History Forum, sponsored by the Toynbee Prize Foundation. Timothy and I had a great conversation about my dissertation "American Streets, Foreign Territory" and now book manuscript, and he wrote up a stellar description of some of the work I've done. In particular, he situates my work within the broader fields of global history and the history of empire, with a focus on some of my methodological innovations. Please check it out!

Monday, November 14, 2016

I just received an e-mail with the only good news I have heard in the horrific last week. Transportation Alternatives, the NYC-based advocacy organization that works on pedestrian and cyclist safety and access, has issued a statement of its commitment to putting racial justice at the core of its work. The statement recognizes not only that unsafe streets are more unsafe for people of color but also that demands for police intervention to make streets safer can put those very same folks at new risks of penal sanction. This is extremely important.

Upcoming Talks

Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 4:00pm
Robinson Hall Lower Library, Harvard University
Sponsored by: Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History

Past Talks

Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations Annual Meeting

Thursday, June 23, 2016 - 11:45am
Room A, Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice at the University of San Diego
Panel: The Color of Modernization: American Racial Politics and International Development

© 2017 Stuart Schrader